Cork

Coast To Coast in Ireland: Intersections

Our taxi drops us back at Bweeng, in front of a forest of signs telling us where we’ve been – the Avondhu Way – and pointing us where we need to go. It’s the first of two days on the Duhallow Way and we know it will be a long one. Forty kilometres long if the route remains true to our maps.

Duhallow Way is one part of the much longer Blackwater Way, the other part being the Avondhu Way we have just traversed. But even that is but one small segment of a much longer trail, the E8 European Long Distance Walking Trail. (more…)

Coast To Coast in Ireland: Arrival

While my posts describing our coast-to-coast walk in Ireland are well behind the actual walking, our schedule continues at an unforgiving pace. In fact, today, May 29, we successfully completed our cross-country walk!

We arrived at the western tip of Ireland, Bray Head, on beautiful Valentia Island. Beyond the cliffs lies the Atlantic Ocean, calm today under clear, warm skies. In the other direction lies, a small fishing village and the final resting stop on our Irish walk.

It’s been 24 days on trails, crossing the island from Dublin to this point. A devilish 666 kilometers in total across mountains and bogs, through forests and along ocean cliffs. A tough slog indeed.
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Coast To Coast in Ireland: Cork

After 14 days of non-stop walking, a day’s rest in the nearby city of Cork is a welcome change of pace.

Cork itself is a place that calls out to the walker. It’s a bustling little city with streets that lead into still smaller lanes, encouraging us to lose ourselves with the throngs of fellow flaneurs in the maze of shops and pubs. 

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Coast To Coast in Ireland: Avondhu Way

Where the East Munster Way ends, in front of a small church in Clogheen, so begins the Avondhu Way. It’s the first leg of a much longer trail system, the Blackwater Way, named after and loosely following Ireland’s longest river, the Blackwater.

Blackwater Way carries a certain amount of mystery and uncertainty. Of all the trails that form the Irish coast-to-coast network, this one has the least information available. And what information that can be found talks about poor or missing signage, reroutings due to landowner quibbles, too much travel on tarmac. And its remoteness. 

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