12 Days of Styxx, 2018 Edition: Day 2

Welcome to a year in the life of our greyhound/lurcher Styxx, compressed into twelve daily posts leading up to Christmas.

Styxx takes a walk along the Assiniboine River after a fresh fall of snow on March 5, 2018.

Card, February

12 Days of Styxx, 2018 Edition: Day 1

Welcome to a year in the life of our greyhound/lurcher Styxx, compressed into twelve daily posts leading up to Christmas.

We start with a late afternoon walk on February 23, 2018. Gail and Styxx take a photo break during a walk on frozen Omand’s Creek in Winnipeg.

November

 

 

 

CDMX: A Zócalo Walkabout

Standing here, in the Zócalo, the heart of Mexico City, I can see the city’s entire cultural history laid out. Layers of history spanning thousands of years. I can see it and I can touch it, all from this vantage point.

Physically, the Zócalo itself is nothing more than a large central plaza, a stone-paved platform for events, sacred and profane, bureaucratic and royal. It is the city’s place to protest or celebrate. It is the place where its people come to be seen and to be heard.

It is also the centre of the colonial-era city, a legacy best represented by the Cathedral Metropolitana, a vast heap of Baroque and Neo-Classical stonework dominating an entire side of the square. Construction started in 1524, just as the invading Spaniards began redefining Mexico City in their likeness.

Yet, just off to the right side of the Cathedral, tucked between it and a ring of Hispanic buildings, is the site of an earlier civilization, the one demolished in order to establish the Mexico City we see today.  (more…)

CDMX: Night of the Dead

One of Mexico City’s sixteen boroughs, Xochimilco is, in some respects, the heart of the city. The vast lake that once covered the Valley of Mexico—including the entire site of today’s Mexico City—was tamed 1,000 years ago with a network of canals defined by artificial islands, called chinampas. Canals were once the main mode of transportation throughout the valley. Since colonization, that vast network has shrunk to what remains in Xochimilco. Today, it’s not more than a remnant, an endangered World Heritage Site. Yet what is left is a remarkable, enchanting place.

Today, Xochimilco is best known as a playground. This is where Mexicans come on Sundays and tourists come at all times for an entertaining afternoon ride along the canals on colourful trajinera boats. 

But, for Gail and me, the goals for our journey to Xochimilco have been deliciously disrupted. This is November 1, the first of two Days of the Dead.  (more…)

My 2018 Holiday Gift List

This year, I offer a mixed bag of gift ideas for the walker and/or photographer. All have been used, tested and read by me or my wife Gail in 2018. (more…)

CDMX: Marigolds for the Dead

November 1. Day of the Dead in Mexico City. We are in Mercado Jamaica, in the Venustiano Carranza neighbourhood, about 5 kilometres southeast of our hotel. It is here, in this bustling flower and food market, that families come to buy marigolds with the hope that their vivid colour and floral scent will guide their dead ancestors to altars (ofrendas) they will set up this evening.

Our guide for the next few hours is Ariane Ruiz from Eat Mexico tour company. Her knowledge is invaluable, helping our small group of anglophones comprehend the Mexican concept of death and the role of ofrendas on Dia de Muertos. Of no less importance, she guides us in an  exploration of street food found in and around the market.

I will let the pictures do the talking as we navigate the aisles of Mercado Jamaica. (more…)