Photography

A little Taste of Winter

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I call it my Assiniboine Park Loop, a good 10-kilometre walk from my Wolseley neighbourhood home, down the river trails lining the south bank of Assiniboine River, through Assiniboine Park, its English and Leo Mol Sculpture Gardens and then back home on the north side of the river, following the quiet residential streets of St. James. Along that return loop, I pass by Bourkevale Community Centre with its leash-free dog park on the river side and outdoor ice rink on the other.

This is that rink, a sleek surface of manicured ice waiting for a game of hockey. Its sole occupant on this sunny afternoon is a lone, broken chair that somehow escaped from its home in the community centre hall and ended up here, in this improbable winter scene.

How many times have I walked this same loop over the seasons and years, seeing the same things every time? Yet there always seems to be a red chair waiting to be discovered, the gift of a good walk.

 

 

CDMX: A Zócalo Walkabout

Standing here, in the Zócalo, the heart of Mexico City, I can see the city’s entire cultural history laid out. Layers of history spanning thousands of years. I can see it and I can touch it, all from this vantage point.

Physically, the Zócalo itself is nothing more than a large central plaza, a stone-paved platform for events, sacred and profane, bureaucratic and royal. It is the city’s place to protest or celebrate. It is the place where its people come to be seen and to be heard.

It is also the centre of the colonial-era city, a legacy best represented by the Cathedral Metropolitana, a vast heap of Baroque and Neo-Classical stonework dominating an entire side of the square. Construction started in 1524, just as the invading Spaniards began redefining Mexico City in their likeness.

Yet, just off to the right side of the Cathedral, tucked between it and a ring of Hispanic buildings, is the site of an earlier civilization, the one demolished in order to establish the Mexico City we see today.  (more…)

CDMX: Night of the Dead

One of Mexico City’s sixteen boroughs, Xochimilco is, in some respects, the heart of the city. The vast lake that once covered the Valley of Mexico—including the entire site of today’s Mexico City—was tamed 1,000 years ago with a network of canals defined by artificial islands, called chinampas. Canals were once the main mode of transportation throughout the valley. Since colonization, that vast network has shrunk to what remains in Xochimilco. Today, it’s not more than a remnant, an endangered World Heritage Site. Yet what is left is a remarkable, enchanting place.

Today, Xochimilco is best known as a playground. This is where Mexicans come on Sundays and tourists come at all times for an entertaining afternoon ride along the canals on colourful trajinera boats. 

But, for Gail and me, the goals for our journey to Xochimilco have been deliciously disrupted. This is November 1, the first of two Days of the Dead.  (more…)

You’re Invited to my upcoming gallery show: Walking Styxx

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It’s been more than a few weeks since my last blog post. Since completing the Navigating Hope series on WalkClickMake, I have been hard at work preparing for my upcoming exhibition:

Walking Styxx
a month of psychogeographic walks with a greyhound

Winnipeg Architecture Foundation (WAF)
266 McDermot Avenue
Winnipeg, Manitoba

September 28 to October 31, 2018
Opening: September 28, 7:00 pm

Walking Styxx is presented as part of Winnipeg’s Flash Photographic Festival, running from October 1 to October 31, 2018. (more…)