winnipeg

Little White Walks: An In-Spired Walk

The seventh of a series of jaunts in the key of white. This week: a walk to the top of the Canadian Museum of Human Rights. 

This post is dedicated to Gail, my partner for life. Together, may we continue to climb towers of hope for years to come.

 

From high above, Gail and I can see the junction of the Red and Assiniboine Rivers on the horizon. We can trace the River Trail’s course as it winds along the surface of those frozen waterways. Below us, a blanket of snow stretches across the broad plain of a territory known, these last few decades, as The Forks but, for centuries before that, as the home of First Nations people. All around us lies Winnipeg with its high-rises and bridges and train tracks, a belt of development tightening its buckle around the city’s earliest settlement.

This is our view on this wintery afternoon. We are about 100 metres above the rivers, perched atop the Canadian Museum of Human Rights (CMHC) on a slender circular platform surrounded by a delicate mesh of steel and glass.  (more…)

Little White Walks: River Trail, Part Two

The sixth of a series of jaunts in the key of white. This week: part two of a January 26, 2018 walk along Winnipeg’s Assiniboine and Red Rivers.

As I approach the Osborne Street Bridge, a form slowly reveals itself below the bridge’s concrete arches.

The first of the warming huts.

The warming huts are the latest iteration of our city’s on-again, off-again romance with our frozen rivers. In past, ski hills have thrust their avid adventurers from high above the river’s eroding banks down to the Assiniboine’s icy surface. So too have tobogganers been sent gleefully on near-death thrill rides from the heights of wood platforms down to the frozen Red River.  (more…)

Little White Walks: River Trail, Part One

The fifth of a series of jaunts in the key of white. This week: part one of a January 26, 2018 walk along Winnipeg’s Assiniboine and Red Rivers.

Is it a gift offered up by nature? Or is it nature conspiring against the city? These are questions that come and go from my mind as I make my way down nature’s highway, along the frozen surface of the Assiniboine River and, later in the day, the mighty Red.  (more…)

Little White Walks: Assiniboine Forest

The fourth of a series of jaunts in the key of white. This week: a January 19, 2018 walk through Assiniboine Forest in Winnipeg.

I lift the rear hatch of the car. Styxx emerges from the dark interior, unfolding from a tight curl into a tall spindly majestic greyhound. From his car door podium, he surveys the world. He stretches his head high, scans from side-to-side, sniffs the cold air and I can see in his eyes a delighted recognition of where he is and what he will be doing for the next two hours.  (more…)

Little White Walks: Assiniboine River

The third in a series of jaunts in the key of white. This week: a January 7, 2018 walk alongside the Assiniboine River in Winnipeg.

It’s a well-trod path, this one. From our home in the Wolseley neighbourhood, it takes me west along the south side of Assiniboine River to my destination, Assiniboine Park, and then back home along trails and quiet streets skirting the river’s north bank. (more…)

Christmas Express

In its 2017 “Best List: 16 Scenic Train Trips”, National Geographic Traveler magazine highlights Via Rail’s  The Canadian. Writer Everett Potter had this to say about it:

“After three decades of riding trains all over the world – rural China, the Swiss Alps, Latin American Jungles – I am still thrilled by a classic rail journey. Take The Canadian, where passengers can spend three days watching the countryside scenery from Toronto to Vancouver via dome cars. From the wheat fields to the jagged Rockies to the thickly forested Coast Mountains, it’s one of the world’s most amazing routes”.

I cannot argue with Potter’s excitement.

In December, I completed my third annual trip on The Canadian, embarking as usual on a blustery, cold afternoon at Winnipeg’s imposing Union Station and exiting on a slightly warmer morning at Vancouver’s Pacific Central Station. (more…)