art deco

Walking to Rome: Via Francigena Day 16 Redux

This is the last walking day of our first stage of the Via Francigena. If the photos seem familiar, it is because we completed this day’s walk on September 24. I wanted to report the successful completion on that day even though I had only posted days 1 to 11 by that time. The missing days 12 to 15, along with a few rest days, have now been completed and posted. I’m now up-to-date. 

To bring some closure, here is my earlier, slightly edited Day 16 post:

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Walking to Rome: Via Francigena Day 14

Bapaume

Beaulencourt British Commonwealth Cemetery

Thilloy Road Commonwealth Cemetery

Manchester Commonwealth Cemetery

Église Saint-Pierre, Villers au Flos

Église catholique Notre-Dame de Rocquigny, architect Jean-Louis Sourdeau, 1929-32

Necropole Nationale, Moislains

Église Paroissiale, Moislains, architect Louis Faille, 1928-32

Canal du Nord

Australian Remembrance Trail of the Battle of Mont-Saint-Quentin

Péronne (more…)

Walking to Rome: Via Francigena Day 13

The Via Francigena may have originated as a religious pilgrimage dating back to the 900s (if not earlier). But here, today, as Gail and I walk through the rolling farmland of northern France, we are reminded over and over again that the line we follow is as much informed by the Great War as it is by religion.

Yes, there are the small villages dominated by tall-spired churches. But even these carry the weight of war.  (more…)

Walking to Rome: Via Francigena Day 16

I am jumping forward in time with this post from Day 17 of our Via Francigena pilgrimage.

This is the last day of our walk, at least for this season. With our arrival at the small and somewhat industrial town of Tergnier, we will move on by train to Laon, then Reims for an overnight stay and then to London via the Eurostar chunnel train for a few days before finally returning to Winnipeg.

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CDMX: A Walk in Condesa

It started out as a hacienda and a vast swath of land covering much of western Mexico City, owned by the Countess (or condesa) of San Mateo de Valparaíso, Maria de la Campa y Cos. By 1902, the land had evolved from her large estate to a colonia, or neighbourhood, for the middle and upper classes. (more…)